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Level 5 Leadership - How to be a Level 5 Leader

By Cathy McCullough

    Wed, Jan 1, 2020 @ 09:00 AM Strategies for Growth, Annual & Quarterly Planning, Accountable Leaders & Teams

    The Level 5 Leadership Stage is Set…

    Have you ever had this "strange" feeling that you just couldn’t shake? I recently went through that. It was after a two-day Annual Planning Session with a newly formed executive team (the company had been through a major transition). It was a great two days but the reality is that as the session began, the “stage” was a bit of a mess because the executive team was fractured in their vision for the company. In spite of that, alignment and clarity of vision were created over those two days. But after the session, my reflective thinking left me feeling suspended inside. It was a strange feeling.

    The strange feeling actually began to linger as the two day session ensued; it was just something I noticed but I couldn’t get my mind wrapped around what it was. It was subtle, non-obtrusive yet politely prominent. It just lingered. Upon reflective thinking after the session came the epiphany. It was the CEO. Yet, I still couldn’t pinpoint anything. So, I asked myself: What is it about this CEO that I can’t grasp? What is it? 

    Team Dynamics

    During the two-day session, combative moments emerged about the right kind of leadership style, about a perception around how (and on what) money was to be spent, about the importance (or not) of a strong technology infrastructure, about pay scales, etc. In reflectively thinking about these moments, I noted that the CEO met each attempted battle with a genuine sense compassion, extreme patience, and a true regard for the perspectives being voiced. He never even got close to expressing frustration, anger, disappointment, or exasperation. He just stayed a steady and effective leader.

    Since I couldn’t pinpoint this strange and suspended feeling I kept having about this CEO, I decided to describe him: Gentle spirit, quiet manner, extreme patience, overall humility; his very (very) genuine desire to build something great; his willingness to mentor this new team of eight toward a co-created vision of a great company; his love for the city in which he’s lived for most of his life; his authentic love for the great game of baseball; his compelling vision; his emotional intelligence was off the charts. During the session, watching him quietly position his thoughts for leveraging future success was nothing less than masterful and that he would be able to drive the company from good to great.

    My Encounter with Level 5 Leadership…

    Then suddenly, in a flash, my reflective thinking allowed me to recognize the incredible power of a Level 5 Leader. That was it. I finally solved the mystery of that all so rare of a feeling that you recognize, but then again, you don’t. It was an amazing moment that left me feeling blessed to work with this CEO. 

    According to Jim Collins, there are five levels of leaders, with Level 5 Leaders being the most positively impactful. In Collins’ research, the mindset of Level 5 Leaders is different: They have a paradoxical blend of personal humility and professional will. Behaviorally, Level 5 Leaders are characterized by a prolific respect for people, by their unselfish perspective, and by a relentless focus on achieving results. They are great leaders.

    Level 5 Leaders: Personal Humility & Professional Will

    Personal Humility: This CEO met contention with grace. He met innuendo with quiet fortitude. He met the push-back (by some) to setting specific KPIs and metrics with a soft brilliance, akin to something that I’ve rarely seen.

    Professional Will: Yet, to underestimate this CEO’s commitment would be a gross mistake. When someone called him the day before this strategic thinking session was to begin and firmly stated, “I don’t need to plan. I have things to do!”, this CEO’s firm response was: “This session isn’t optional. See you tomorrow morning.” He’s also purposefully intent on building a culture of transparency by establishing a routine of Weekly, Monthly, and Quarterly executive team meetings to jointly discuss solutions to key challenges and to identify new opportunities. Participation isn’t optional.

    Level 5 Leaders: Clock-Builders vs. Time-Tellers

    Greatness is a methodical journey. Having this two-day Annual Planning Session where this team could simply talk through their current issues and continue on to build a set of Core Values and a future Vision and BHAG put them all on the same page. To engrain the importance, relevance, and long-term sustainability of what they created, the CEO is following through by using the Rhythm Dashboard so they can realistically track their progress. By doing so, he’s beginning to build accountability and foster a culture based on transparency and dialogue.

    Another aspect of clock-building is that this CEO’s vision is to give all employees the opportunity to prosper…to live the American Dream. “The company," he said, “ is really just a tool to help improve people’s lives.” Hence, the company will grow toward providing incredible educational opportunities for all employees, which will include an array of courses in financial literacy, language proficiency, specific skills, personal edification, and formal education, if desired. It would give him nothing but the most incredible satisfaction to look back on his life knowing he helped provide avenues for personal greatness.  He’s laying a foundation for the company to go on without him. As Stephen Covey noted, begin with the end in mind. This CEO wouldn’t say this but I will: His legacy will have an impact on people, not just on a ‘company.’ He stopped telling time a while back. Instead, he’s turned to building a clock.

    Level 5 Leaders: Behind-the-Scenes vs. On-Stage

    I lost track of the times during these two days that this CEO gave the glory to someone else. If you put this with his gentle spirit, you get an individual who’s perfectly secure enough in his own skin to play a supporting role. He gives the stage to everyone else, with just the right kind of pride. He admitted what he didn’t know and specifically where he would lean on the expertise of those in the room. His need is not for himself, but for others. Life isn’t about him; it’s about channeling his ambitious nature to build up others who will then build a great and enduring organization.      

    And so went the script. After two days of intense (but really good) open discussion, this new team is set for the upcoming year and they all know their focus for the upcoming Quarter. With Values in place, they’ve already begun managing and leading with them. When one team member went "rogue" the next day, he was reminded of the Values and given (once again) additional room for improvement and adherence to the new direction of the company. Keep in mind: The accountabilities are very real for this CEO and there are limits. Once again: Personal Humility combined with Professional Will.

     

    Throughout it all, I saw a genuine spirit emerge from a gentle man who leads with purpose and focused intent. Meeting a Level 5 Leader is a rare experience. I count it as a privilege to know one.

    culture

    Want more information on Team Accountability and Level 5 Leadership? Check out these additional resources:

    The Power of Systems and People: Accountable Leaders and Teams leadership development program to improve team performance.

    Take Our Team Accountability Assessment to see how your team stacks up.

    Why You Need a Peak Performance Plan for Your A-Players

    Leadership Accountability Definition in Management

    Team Accountability Begins with Personal Accountability

    How top CEOs Close the Strategy Execution Gap

    Follow Up: The Key To Leadership Development

    Building Team Accountability: Job Scorecards

    10 Signs of an Accountable Culture [Infographic]

    Growing Team Accountability in Your Organization

    Quick Tips for Building Accountability

    5 Steps to Having an Accountability Discussion [Video]

    Learn more about accountable leaders and teams.

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